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when it comes to effective education policies. former chancellor of d.c. public schools michelle rhee takes us inside her state-by-state assessment but first bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> for some this is a happy forecast, for others who like the snow and cold, this isn't the week for you. this is a january thaw. we haven't had much of a winter. we were cold last week and this week completely different story. all the cold and cool air up in canada and mild, pacific air and warm air from the gulf of mexico streaming through the eastern half of the country. now, there will be some rainy spots. we'll talk about that in a second. look at these temperatures today. these are your highs today, mid-40s up through new york city. even chicago, near 40 degrees and all of the areas from kansas city, oklahoma city, dallas, right through the southeast well above average. now, we have rain, the worst weather in the country, by far, you're waking up to it from seattle and rainy, windy weather and rain around spokane and a couple more inches before it changes over to rain. we are warm a
not tighten up our infrastructure, our education. we are 25th in math. it is unreal. where do they think we will grow if we have nothing to show? we have idiots in congress. there is more greek than anything else. host: you mentioned the republican position on future taxes. here is what the washington post says -- this is from abc's this week with george stephanopoulos. --nator mcconnell said jen, maryland, democrat. what do you think about tidying spending to a debt limit increase? caller: i do not think we have the correct information to make that decision. the us government does not have a rational accounting system. if we buy a house, we fund it with debt over time. we borrow. in the us, if we build a road, we pay out-of-pocket cash. we have an accounting system that treated infrastructure and associated the cost of that with the debt. where are we? are we spending current s?penses >> we do not kno we do not know. host: do you think that is likely to happen? what would you do? what would you practically do to change things? caller: i would try to get that type of accounting system in pl
reform. this included the most ambitious education reform in decades. had the largest infrastructure investments since eisenhower. the largest research investment after. the largest low-cost tax cut since reagan went to more than 95% of the country and less than 10% country noticed it. but in my book i do try to get deep into the bowels of the white house and the backgrounds of capitol hill, but also to be a fly on the wall on the energy department weatherization division, actually known as the turkey farm. add to the local high-speed real meetings in the central valley where i saw obama called it replaced. i did spend some time in that way to think he's too fancy sillinger factory factory, to. but my novel approach was to try and figure out what he's doing. another spoiler alert here, but the most important thing you should know about obama's a mostly try to do what he said he would do. he came into office at this and usually well-defined theory and a straight up with that. to guard this. his kid and agenda in 2008 to attract a lot of attention in the media was obsessed with his rac
to educate the young boys about their sexual responsibility, and there has to be more discussion of that in the country, and the third part of this is that the politicians are losing elections by double digits, and is this where you want the draw the line in the sand. for a party to find the way out of of the wilderness and back into the mainstream of life, they continue to make decisions to the outside where most common sense americans are democrat and republican. >> and this is what is tricky about it. we are fine with the current vawa, and we don't want to expand it. there is a problem there, because you are saying that some women are better than some women. but a woman being sexually assaulted or raped is a woman period. whether she is a tourist from france or undocumented worker being abused by her boyfriend or a person who lives on the tribal land, she is being assaulted. >> so what happens is that you will get a temporary visa so that you can prosecute -- >> sometimes. >> but it has only happened one time, so it is only part of the bill. >> and we will up immigration in th
the educational experience for all students. it's a valid concern say experts who suggest admissions boards rely as much on rigorous language screening as son test scores. >> then it can go smoothly. it takes training and the part of the staff, in fact, training of the faculty to engage these students within the classroom. >> and elsewhere on campus, where the number of chinese students pursuing an american education is only expected to grow. i see like more and more students come from mainland china and they like really want to have this opportunity here. >> in santa clara california, clauda cowan, fox news. >> i'm shannen bream in bottom of the hour. time for the top of the news. rare speech to supporters tonight we have rare reaction to what he said to the u.s. state department. it is yet another attempt by him to claim to power. it does nothing for the goal to a political condition. only for the syrians, but their allies, russian, not offered a peace plan and the rebels won't even talk. in u.s. politics, they would call it the optics and they're important. president assad >> too looking in c
dilute the educational experience for all students. it's a valid concern say experts who suggest admissions boards rely as much on rigorous language screening as son test scores. >> then it can go smoothly. it takes training and the part of the staff, in fact, training of the faculty to engage these students within the classroom. >> and elsewhere on campus, where the number of chinese students pursuing an american education is only expected to grow. i see like more and more students come from mainland china and they like really want to have this opportunity here. >> in santa clara california, clauda cowan, fox news. >> i'm shannen bream in tonight for harris falkner: assad gives a rare speech to supporter and what he says from the u.s. state department. urging syrians to defend their country against the rebels who started against his regime two years ago. it's now a civil war. and 60,000 people estimated to have been killed since it began, saying in a statement. assad's speech today is yet another attempt by the regime to cling to power and does nothing to advance the syrian peop
, when he first came into office, he was slashing education funding at a time when it's essential to rebuilding a middle class america in new jersey. he was giving out hundreds of millions to corporate tax breaks to donors and ideological sort of counterparts. that's the governor he was being, and it was nasty in new jersey, and his approval ratings are nowhere near where they are now. once he started doing the business of government and showing the american people and his voters that government can be a force for good in people's lives, that it's an essential for solving the problems we can't solve on our own -- >> the democratic argument. >> his approval ratings went way up. the fundamental thing is if you are a politician who's antigovernment, there's going to be a limit to what you can accomplish to how sort of coherent you can be, and how truthful you can be. that's where you're not going to be able to say all the things that you really believe, because it's fundamentally at odds with the idea of democracy and dpovt. >> state governors have a very different understanding of t
to happen. >> in the longer term crucial to that is education. one of the important indicators to watch which we don't spend enough time watching is what's happening to the educational attainment of the population and did it rise in this recession as it did in the great depression when people couldn't find work. there's early reasons to hope that it did though probably not as robust as the great depression when people could go to high school which was free, this time they have to go to college, which is not free for most people. >> rose: austan, looking back over the years from 2008 to 2012 and you left a little bit before that, what would you like to redo and would you consider it wiser to have it politically feasible-- big if-- to add 1.3 trillion stimulus to w no tax cuts? >> i don't know the answer. i thought about the context of what was in the stimulus. we know that there was some disagreement among economists of are we talking art a short recession or are we talk about a long recession? so there was a bit of a mixture, there was some short run things like chraung and there were l
. >> rebecca, see the problem in this country. you know it. there you have ted cruz, a well-educated right winger like pat robertson. it's like they flush out their high educations when they get out of school for political purposes. talking about this being a political -- it's not anybody's political agenda. the only person who wants to have gun control is somebody who is scared of what the gun has been doing. it's nothing but trouble to be for gun control. you don't get any votes for that, but there you have a guy talking out of his whatever about how somehow it's a political agenda. what do we do in a country that can't talk gun control without being accused of advantageous personal politics? >> it's interesting because, you know, nobody stands to make money either from prevention. i guess in these sort of moments you think who stands to benefit from policies that are going to promote more sales of guns? who stands to benefit from policies of prevention? it's the general public. nobody makes money out of people being -- not being hurt or killed, and i guess if you think about the motivat
tax cuts and fighting with the teachers union over tenure, pay and education reforms, but he now preaches reconciliation in his address tuesday afternoon. and jon, he did that, but he never once compromised a single value. he fought the unions. he won. he got the unions coming to him to reform schools. and he's fought budget battles, and he's won. he's won them on his terms, but he doesn't vilify the democrats. he works with them. and this is -- again, for some reason, for some reason in washington, d.c., and with certain members of the conservative entertainment complex that follow washington, d.c., actually working with the other side and winning is seen as a political sin. >> yeah. the one nuance i'd add to that is from the bleachers is it reflects of ideological warfare is the problem. politics is about ideas. it should be. fights over education, fights over taxes are important. it's just the fact when you invest everything in your eye delogical position and decline to recognize that the nature of a republic is to give mutual concessions of opinion or we're not going to make
as to why we had the '95/'96 government strike. it's the same things. it's about education. it's about medicare. it's about the environment. you talked about going on vacation and coming back and hearing the same thing. we're talking about the same thing from '95 as we are today. we haven't really decided yet what type of country we want to be and how we want to spend the money in order to get there. we spend a great deal of money on education. we probably spend more money per student than any other industrialized nations. yet when you look at the collective global testing, we're somewhere in the middle of the pack. so the conversation we need to be having isn't just about how much money or how are we spending that money, and is this moving us towards the type of country we want to be? >> that's much too complicated. i'm just kidding. >> this is the point. this is the debate. there has to be a debate. we're going to debate how we spend our money. we're now talking about when we have the debates. we should be having it in the traditional manner in which the governments operate. if we do
by the pakistan for promoting education for women has been released from the hospital. what's next for malala and the girls she was fighting for. >>> pledging bipartisanship, but as he gets ready to come back from hawaii and start the new year, he also has a warning for republicans. don't use the debt ceiling as leverage. >> one thing i will not compromise over is whether or not congress should pay the tab for a bill they've already racked up. if congress refuses the ability for the united states to pay its bills on time, it could be cat strofk. kristen welker with the president in honolulu. it will be a big change of scenery when he gets back to washington. tell us some of the battles on the horizon for the president. >> reporter: hi, craig. good afternoon. there are three budget battles on the horizon. the one getting the most attention right now is the fight over the debt ceiling and the debt ceiling is like the nation's credit card. the nation has essentially maxed out at this point in time. so congress, the white house will have a bigeb
and bear arms. advancing the shooting sports. championing gun safety, education and training. creating a vital legacy by answering freedom's call. and we are growing stronger every day. we are the n.r.a. and the n.r.a. is you. host: that is from the n.r.a. two stories you can find online and front page of the leading newspapers. "new york times" looking at symbols of grief piling up. from the "washington post" broad strategy on guns being weighed far beyond the ban on assault weapons. they are on their websites. we will continue the conversation on the agenda ahead as lawmakers return the start of the 113th congress. president back in washington later t today. later, looking at just what members of congress earn, pensions and salary. we will have more with daniel shuman of the sunlight foundation. keeping track of other programs. good morning, nancy. >> good morning, steve. on today's shows the fallout from the fiscal cliff a look at the second term in office. all five re-air on c-span radio with nbc's "meet the press." today's the guests include mitch mcconnell, former republican sena
you see problems or opportunities? with an advanced degree in education from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to meet these challenges and make a difference in the lives of students. let's get started at capella.edu. nah, i'm good. ♪ [ male announcer ] every time you say no to a cigarette, you celebrate a little win. nicoderm cq, the patch with time release smart control technology. quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. ♪ you are an obsession you're my obsession ♪ ♪ you are an obsession you're my obsession ♪ ♪ who do you want me to be -- >>> all right, it's "fixation" where we comb the intraweb -- mostly ron does this research -- >> middle of the night. >> ron does not sleep so we can bring you bizarre footage. let me start. this is a guy who got 156 seconds to run through an electronics store. this is in the netherlands. imagine if you had that. we did the math. actually i took a calculator. that's 2 1/2 minutes -- >> you actually needed a calculator to figure that out. >> i've always been math impaired. he got two tvs, some apple products, some phones. a
's something else? >> look at your skill sets, your education, passions, interests, and say what problem could i solve with the skills, passions and interests they currently have. and then look to those problems and see if you can start a business or start a service company solving those problems. it's really that simple. it's not complicated. >> if i think i'm a failure, i will be a failure? >> yeah. >> value of positive thinking, it is important. your mindset is important. even though hoda doesn't think so. >> i like you fine, steve. >> steve, thank you very, very much. >> world renowned dog behaviorist and trainer cesar milan. >> i think that's the doggy you need to take home. >> really? >> so cute. >> right after this. >>> it's time for your weather channel forecast. over the next couple of days. we're going to start with today's forecast where we're going to have a big story of rain anywhere from the gulf coast all the way up toward minneapolis, maybe a little bit of a mix. but the story really is this storm moving up spreading warmth and rain with it. and then weather we have a winter st
, and dealing with problems like gun violence and immigration and education and infrastructure. we've got to stop being accountants. i think if we are going to keep talking like this, we might as well have a constitutional amendment requiring all members of congress to be accountants. because all we're going to be doing for four areas is talking about budgets. >> carly fiorina, there is some symmetry here. the white house would argue that the 2010 election happened, the republicans had big gains. $20 billion cuts in the budget control act of last year. the president wins re-election. gets his tax hikes, now we've got a debt ceiling negotiation. they are going to push for additional spending cuts. is this the right balance to get ultimately to where we have to go? >> well, unfortunately, i think this will sound like a crazy thing to say. but everyone in washington is spending way too much time talking about the politics and not enough time talking about the pragmatic facts. here are the pragmatic facts. the economy has been in a slow-growth mode now for three years, reconfirmed by the late
think all children need to be educated. women can't go to the movie theater in afghanistan. >> no, they can't. if they try to it would be a dangerous prospect. the men that go to the movie theaters, we have to remember afghanistan doesn't have a class that have jobs, many boys are going there and causing troubles. girls cannot go and bear by go out by themselves without being harassed. massive sexual harass. me ment on the streets. there are children providing for their families and treated pretty badly. >> we need to continue talking about this. thanks for being here. great to see you. as we mentioned president obama and president karzai will hold a joint news conference at 1:15 p.m. eastern time. we're going to bring it to you live right here on msnbc. at a dry cleaner, we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small business ear
? with an advanced degree in education from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to meet these challenges and make a difference in the lives of students. let's get started at capella.edu. >>> i know the whole nation would like to join me now in saying happy birthday, tricky dick. born 100 years ago today, january 9th, 1913, our nation's 37th president, richard m. "tricky dick" nixon. president nixon of course is most remembered for resigning in disgrace, but he is also remembered for legendary paranoia. >> also, never forget the press is the enemy. the press is the enemy. the press is the enemy. the establishment is the enemy. the professionals are the enemy. the professors are the enemy. write that on the blackboard 100 times and never forget it. >> write that on the blackboard 100 times! that is the kind of thing for which we have remembered richard nixon in the four decades since he became our nation's only sitting president to resign the office. but now today on what would have been nixon's 100 birthday from this comfortable distance, mr. nixon can also be remembered as a president wh
into good community development and education and schools. >> i love the conceit of well, we're just making the movie so we can start a conversation. >> right. >> in fact, we have been having this conversation as a country. we have been -- there have been hearings held everywhere. studies done all over the place. just journalism done. the conversation is on going and the conclusion more or less is that, hey, this looks like a pretty good technology. we are putting safeguards on it to make sure we're not poisoning wells. >> people are working. >> the horse is out of the barn on fracking. that's the deal. this movie won't stop it. the keystone pipeline, the liberals, the democrats are trying to stop the keystone pipeline, guess what? that horse is also out of the barn and it's going to go through. >> i think they should do all of the above. i think they ought to put wind farms all through the nantucket sound where i spend every single august. >> there's hope for you yet, jimmy williams. >> and guess what? i don't care if it kills a seagull. i don't care. if it gives me clean energy and it giv
of education and specialization, those tend to be going begging. there are opportunities there. it takes a lot of schooling an effort to get yourself where you're in position to take those jobs. -- and effort to get yourself where you're in a position to take those jobs. if you want to be a waitress, you can probably find a job. if you want to be a brain surgeon, you can probably find a job. if you want to be an aircraft mechanic making $38 an hour, that can be a lot tougher. there is one thing that is helping with that, this energy resurgence. we're seeing an awful lot of energy jobs being created because of this process the people referred to as a fracking. and conventional means of extracting oil and gas. -- unconvential means of extracting oil and gas. another area that is doing pretty well is spinoffs from agriculture. if we have a somewhat normal year in terms of whetheather ths agricultureverage purchase o sector. there are some points of hope within that structure is generally true that the low- paying jobs -- structure. it is generally true that low- paying jobs and high-paying jobs a
are being created. the jobs that going begging right now, the ones the require a lot of education and specialization, those tend to be going begging. there are opportunities there. it takes a lot of schooling and effort to get yourself where you're in position to take those jobs. if you want to be a waitress, you can probably find a job. if you want to be a brain surgeon, you can probably find a job. if you want to be an aircraft mechanic making $38 an hour, that can be a lot tougher. there is one thing that is helping with that, this energy resurgence. we're seeing an awful lot of energy jobs being created because of this process the people referred to as fracking. and unconventional means of extracting oil and gas. another area that is doing pretty well is spinoffs from agriculture. if we have a somewhat normal year in terms of weather this year, the agriculture sector. there are some points of hope within that structure. it is generally true that low- paying jobs and high-paying jobs are where the action is right now. host: marlin is joining us from illinois. caller: i have bee
that enchances issues of mental health, education, as well as access to guns. >> he will meet with various stakeholders. tomorrow, vice president biden is going to meet with executives from the national rifle association which has some gun control advocates wondering why since the nra has made it clear it has no interest in supporting legislation or executive action that might help keep guns out of the hands of dangerous people. "the washington post" would argue that the administration needs the nra because of the power, at least the perceived power it still has over members of congress and ultimately it going to be a vote to turn a bill into law. this is a friends close enemies closer strategy. >>> while the white house and congress work to craft some sort of legislation on a national level, new york governor andrew cuomo wants his state to be the first to enact new gun laws in the wake of the shooting at newtown. today, he plans to propose a new restrictive assault weapons ban which would strengthen the state law already in place by covering more guns and magazines. new york one of seven
like shutting down the department of education, the department of labor, the epa. we could say it in a better way. most black folks work at the epa. if we say we're going to shut them down, who is going to vote for us? guest: that is a good point. i always say the enemy of good government is 30 seconds, because all politicians get is 30 seconds, and the lesson we have learned is when you have a candidate that can deliver a clear conservative message, they wind. marco rubio wins. but jeff -- jeff blake won in arizona. everyone, regardless of race or religion has the opportunity to succeed, and america offers better opportunities -- offers that opportunity. i do not think republicans have been inspiring in their message. there are younger senators, governors, house members than very good and a relative basis and to live in that message. -- in delivering that message. tim scott is one of the most aspiring politicians i have encountered in many years marco rubio has the ability to communicate a message better than anyone that has come along in recent years. they are good examples,
that allows them to deal with those tough issues in an educated way and resources to help. and i think that's where we look at our responsibility as, is to help them navigate that decision. that's a personal decision and a hard decision. and let that decision be on the family members and the provider. but we are believers that hospice, especially in circumstances that it's not, um, promising, is the right way to do. and so you take it from a cost discussion to a quality of life discussion. and to me, when you make that quality of life discussion and make the right decision, the cost discussion are bear out -- will bear out there. >> if i understand your point, it is that integrated care is what's going to lead to the efficiencies to eliminate waste and to bring down the cost of the entire health care system. >> i probably just answered the question he was trying to ask me 15 different times. >> the devil, of course, is in the details. >> yeah. >> who is going to be making these decisions as to whether care is provided or not? we all remember it wasn't so long ago that thanks to our insuranc
and probably have become more educated and balanced in understanding how many people feel about the right to bear arms in this country and believe it is as core to them as freedom of speech or freedom of religion. i think the laws that are on the books now would not have kept someone like my father from having a gun. we have real issues on mental health that have to be addressed. we are not seeing money put into programs on the books. but i don't understand why anybody needs an assault weapon in this country. i hope that everybody will come to a table. otherwise people are going to go to their corners and fight not seeing what we need to see get done. >> when you see a movement to restrict gun ownership rights, the inevitable outcome is gun sales, magazine sales, ammo sales guthrough the roof. it is the polar opposite intention of what people on debbie's side. argument want to see. >> we saw this before president obam was elected, when hadt looked like he was going to be elected in 2008 and the time period between the inauguration, you see the big jump in gun sales. there has been some de
shows like "revolution," and "political animal," and they are up 5.50. itt education services is paying $46 million to fannie mae to settle a loan between the two companies, and its shares down 12 crepts, $17.39. bank of america are paying $30.6 # billion to fannie mae to settle plans related to residential mortgage loans. college kids think they are special. more special than ever before. we have that story for you next. charles: center for disease control and prevention reports it's a rare flu strain spreading across the country. 41 states report widespread cases and a number of children died from it. experts say this is the worst flu season in years despite warnings of the bad season, you reader stewart did not get a shot. watch. >> why is that every year, just for the past four or five or six years, you're told, you ought to get a flu shot. i never heard of that before. charles: you should, stuart, and if i could talk you into it, i would have given you one on the show. all right, that's going to be a show down. sandra, did you get a shot? >> i absolutely did. it's the first year i
helper can help you back. and with box tops for education on every box, it helps you help your school. so you're doing good, just by making dinner. hamburger helper. available at walmart. >>brian: obamacare strikes again. more fast food chains saying they'll cut back hours in order to sidestep massive costs associated with the new health care program -- excuse me, the new health care law. >>steve: stuart varney is here with fallout. let's take folks out to nebraska where a wendy's franchisee is saying i'm going to have to cut your hours. >> 11 locations primarily around omaha, 300 people who currently work for wendy's will have their hours cut to a maximum of 28 hours per week. that puts them in the part-time category. that means they do not have to have health insurance from their employer under the health care law. if you're an operation and you've got 50 or more employees, you must offer health insurance. if any of them works more than 30 hours a week. if you're that kind of size of a company and you want to avoid the rising cost of health insurance, you cut people down to under 30 hou
. hamburger helper can help you back. and with box tops for education on every box, it helps you help your school. so you're doing good, just by making dinner. hamburger helper. available at walmart. >>brian: your dog might be able to fetch a ball, roll over and even swim. but can your dog drive a car or a vehicle like that? >>gretchen: in the last couple of weeks we saw rogue, the australian cattle dog driving power wheels on his own. in new zealand we saw these dogs actually drive real cars. >>brian: that is awesome. what is it about dogs that make them capable of doing such awesome things? andrea arden is here, dog trainer and expert. she is not in awe of that. you expect something like that. is that correct, andrea? >> i am in awe of that. dogs have a long history of doing things that help us. hunt for food. there are even dogs now that sniff out cancer. i think what we saw was cool but i think there's other things that dogs do that are way cooler. >>steve: the new zealand dogs, they train them so they drove a car so people would say look, those are shelter dogs. we can get those and t
the time. we're always trying to educate people that probably isn't the best approach. >> scott, this is rich bernstein. you just mentioned you were on the vanguard board. and obviously one of vanguard's big issues is management fees and trying to telling people you shouldn't pay high fees to managers. endowments in general have been still rushing towards alternative investments. where management fees were extraordinarily high. i was wondering if there was an inconsistency there in your dealing with vanguard and maybe what endowments are doing with manager fees? >> no. no. the large endowments have full teams of very talented people who can go out and talk to, you know, investment firms. we interviewed 400 or 500 firms a year. so we have the expertise and the team to do that. we can get access to the very best alternative managers that like having the long-term patient capital. the typical retail investor, of course, is not going to be able to do that. and you would not want them to get in to sort of second-tier funds in the alternative area because they are just going to pay a
for the g.i. bill so today's heroes can get their education too. having chaired my advisory board he knows that our intelligence collect, analyze and depend on good intelligence and chuck recognizes that american leadership is indispensable in a dangerous world. i saw this in our travels together across the middle east. he understands that america stands strongest when we stand with allies and with friends. as a successful businessman, he also knows that even as we make tough fiscal choices, we have to do so wisely, guided by our strategy and keep the military the strongest fighting force the world has ever known. maybe most importantly, chuck knows that war is not an abstraction. he knows that sending young americans to fight and bleed in the dirt and mud, that's something we only do when it's absolutely necessary. my frame of reference, he has said, is geared towards the guy at the bottom who is doing the fighting and the dying. chuck, our troops will always know, just like sergeant hagel was there for his own brother, secretary hagel will be there for you. finally, chuck represents the
, and as educators. as professional athletes we should insure they learn the life skills they need long after playing the game such as fairness, honesty, compassion. jon: look at clemens, for instance. he was acquitted. he testified in front of congress said i never used steroids. he got taken to court for perjury. and he was acquitted, danny. >> he was acquit the. unfortunately he may or may not have taken the steroids but again the focus here is on the children. this, win at all costs mentality, that is taking place in the big leagues has trickled down to the lowest levels. we have parents going after coaches because they don't like that the player is not getting enough playing time. coaches going after officials. there is yelling, there is screaming. there is profanity. there is cheating. we should teach our children better to fail than it is to cheat. we should create winners the fair and honest way. jon: jim, what about that? >> well, yes but you know, there has been a mantra in professional sports for a long time, if you're not cheating you're not trying. that is what goes on these days. everyb
or opportunities? with an advanced degree in education from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to meet these challenges and make a difference in the lives of students. let's get started at capella.edu. >>> we're back, everyone. we got everything straightened out there. those are the president's proposals for broad gun control agenda in the wake of newtown shootings. joining me now, reverend jesse jackson, chairman of the rainbow push coalition. i'm glad we're having this conversation because i know you're behind this. what is your reaction, first of all, to the report and the proposals being considered. are you on board with all of them? >> yes, the president should be congratulated. this is bold leadership in the right direction. remind you, he is not talking about gun control. he's talking about assault weapons control. a gun for your house, you got it. gun for hunting, you got it. these assault weapons threaten national security. they invite the view of homeland security. you can literally destroy railroads and bring down airplanes. there's no purpose for these assault weapons excep
as chairman of the education committee. it was only in 2006 when tom delay was on the boehner ascended again to be leader of the republican party. he led the party until 20 -- from 2010 until now kept the house for two elections. as much as there is a lot of grumbling about the inner's leadership a lot of republicans who have been in the house for a long time feel the boehner is able to stay in power and bring the party back to power and they applaud that. the ron paul question is an interestiinteresti ng one. ron paul is out of congress and the candidate is no longer there but they there are people who watch them in the house. he is a ron paul acolyte. he would fall under that tradition. justin hall from michigan, sophomore. both amash and thomas massey played a a secret vote in a secret that secret that an nec ron paul's sun center rand paul in the senate and elected in 2010. he is continuing to ron the ron paul movement in many ways. is now on the senate relations committee and you'll hear him talk about the realm paul idea of foreign policy and less foreign aid and more conservative idea
slip into the seventh position. >> your education -- manchester and liverpool, geographically very close, historic wry values. >> manny over pool. >> and for the record, mike has a really great six-pack. >> what did you do with the rest -- >> coming up next, what, if anything, did we learn today? aig? we said we were going to turn it around, and we did. woman: we're helping joplin, missouri, come back from a devastating tornado. man: and now we're helping the east coast recover from hurricane sandy. we're a leading global insurance company, based right here in america. we've repaid every dollar america lent us. everything, plus a profit of more than $22 billion. for the american people. thank you, america. helping people recover and rebuild -- that's what we do. now let's bring on tomorrow. ♪ [ male announcer ] this is karen and jeremiah. they don't know it yet, but they're gonna fall in love, get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right af
no child left behind. pension reform, higher education act. i know the guy knows how to deal but in this day and age he is caught between a rock and a hard place. host: why? guest: you are right, he has a tough job. i think he is happy to have the job. we have been through a lot in this country. we had the fiscal crisis. we have two wars, one very unpopular. we have a loss of faith in government out in the country especially within the republican base. the republican party itself has again through a lot of strain with the rise of the tea party. so, boehner has a very difficult task ahead. we had an election where we didn't win, we lost eight seats in the house, our presidential candidate lost fairly convincingly. for republicans is not a fun time. that said boehner is the guy for the job. the fact that he had so many people defect was not a reflection on him it was the bozos who vote the against him. the republican party if it is going to be successful must remain united. if divided the democrats will have a field day. i think that john boehner is the best chance they have to
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